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at a flea market. she bought this for $7, planned to sell it to the highest bidder. why the fbi is now saying not so fast. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... working together has never worked so well. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"
-- spblt for three weeks later. 20 days past the september 11th attacks and fbi isn't in benghazi, they're in tripoli, for security reasons they say, they say that the libyan security forces aren't providing them with security and some sort of visa problem. this is unheard of. so, senator bob corker and joe lieberman among others, they want answers from clapper about why it's happening. >> dave: to the point at that tony schaeffer made on our program yesterday, he's worked with the fbi, some of the toughest and highly technically trained individuals on the planet. comfortable going into hostile zones like benghazi, it must not be an internal reason, it must be someone else they can't go in. >> clayton: bee seeds the tactffac tactffac fact-- besides the fact that libya is a free country and not the hot son that-- as it's unfolding and discussions about james clapper on the show this morning, who is james clapper we'll taking a look at his record. he made headlines in 2010 when asked about that london terrorist attack by diane sawyer and appeared he didn't know what had happened or unfold
in situation. both pittsburgh and fbi s.w.a.t. teams are on the scene of a hostage situation taking place on the 16th floor of a downtown highway. the cw brightsman company we understand is the setting for all of this. an ex-military man we're told walked into that office this morning where apparently he used to work. asked for one individual in particular and has now taken hostages. it is not absolutely clear that the one person that he named is the person who is being held hostage. there might be as many as two hostages. we're told no shots have been fired. unknown weaponry involved and police say they have a visual wall on the suspect the they know who he is. they have brought his mother to the building to help deal with negotiations but so far the hostage situation continues in downtown pittsburgh on the 16th floor of a high-rise. no shots fired so far. we'll keep you updated as the hour rolls along. >> we will. brand new stories and more breaking news. jon: good to see you, arthel the white house is it calling the assault in lib libya a terrorist attack. what is the political fallout
but they told us that a week ago. officials are not acknowledging any kind of progress and f.b.i. team sent here to libya to investigate directly the death, again from all indications remain in tripoli, we have no confirmation they have been to the crime scene. there are growing concerns that the crime scene may be tampered with the longer we wait until we get officials on the ground. again, wrapping up. the crackdown in the short run and long run on these militias might be good for security but might have one other problem with the probe. some of the suspects in connection with the killing may have left. it's a tough situation. >> kelly: gregg palkot. we appreciate that worth. >> jamie: still trying to get answers there and this big question. what is the next step to calm the violence in the region? what kind of role should be the u.s. play here. here ambassador is john bolton, former ambassador to the united nations joining us this sunday morning. good to see you, good morning. >> i wanted to broaden it out a bit and ask you overall, particularly this week, mahmoud ahmadinejad is in new york t
of treating it like it's a "law & order" issue, rather than a war on terrorism. they have sent the f.b.i. over who had to cool their heels for days before they could even get in there, and i don't know if they are in benghazi yet. but, you know, i heard yesterday about this journal that was found by -- of the ambassador, three days after the attack by a journalist walking through the compound. this is just lew ludicrous. on the face of it the way they are handling this is so incompetent, and treating it again like it's a "law & order" issue, they've sent the f.b.i. to investigate, like when they find out what is wrong are they going to try to arrest somebody in libya? bill: we'll be in touch with your office and find out what you find out. thank you for your time. i want to bring in senior brooks, a senior fellow for national security affairs. peter what is going on here. >> i have the same concerns that the chairman has, he just expressed, and he's probably better informed than i am. we see all of these loose treads on this narrative coming out of the white house. my sense at this point becau
to know that there's an fbi investigation that has begun and it will take some time to be completed. that will tell us with certainty what transpired. but our current assessment, is that in fact what began as a spontaneous not a premeditated response to what had transpired in cairo, there was a violent protest that was undertaken in reaction to this video that was disseminated. we believe that folks in benghazi, a small number of people came to the consulate to replicate this sort of challenge that was posed in cairo and then as that unfolded, it seems to have been hijacked, let us say, by some individual clusters of extremists that came with heavier weapons, weapons as you know that, in the wake of the revolution in libya, are quite common and accessible. then it evolved from there. we'll wait to see exactly what the investigation finally confirms. but that's the best information that we have at present. >> why was there such a security breakdown, why wasn't there better security at the compound in benghazi? why weren't there u.s. marines in tripoli? >> first of all, we had substan
. martha: could be. how does all this impact the fbi investigation going on there into the death of ambassador stevens and three other americans? >> reporter: martha, the word we're getting on the ground from benghazi it is calm. authorities are more in control. that is a good thing. the word also been getting on the ground here that the fb i-team sent to this country to investigate the crime has been hampered, maybe even blocked from the benghazi situation and the crime scene there. so that could help. overall, frankly also the public is going after the very militant groups that a lot of people suspect had a real hand in the killing of ambassador stevens and the other americans. that might be a good thing. as for the libyan authorities we're not exactly sure how fast that investigation is going forward. we met with one official today. he claims to me that they have 25 suspects in custody. but frankly in the past week or so we have heard one number, number two, number three numbers for arrests and suspects. one other concern about the crackdown, martha, the militants are being fo
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)